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Therapist

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People are not just a collection of symptoms

Online Therapist

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Online Therapist Adrian

Adrian Yates

Hypnotherapist and Psychotherapist/counsellor

Has diplomas in hypnotherapy and counselling/psychotherapy.

My name is Adrian, I am a professional self-employed online therapist and have been working online full-time for over ten years.
I started working as a traditional face to face therapist providing hypnotherapy and psychotherapy with some charity organisations almost sixteen years ago. Progressed to working online from April 2011 when I founded my online therapy business and have now been in private practice fully focused online for over ten years.

 In my fifteen years as a therapist, I have helped and supported many people who were struggling to cope with everything from depression and anxiety issues, anger issues, sexual confusion, and gender issues, as well as sexual abuse and trauma-induced post-traumatic stress disorder. (PTSD) Over the years working as an online therapist I have been privileged to meet many wonderful wise people. 

Seeing and supporting my clients to face difficult and distressing memories with fortitude and courage wisdom can be a humbling experience. Those clients have also helped me gain more insights into what it means to be human, I do believe that I have also learned and gained wisdom from listening and collaborating with my clients.

How I work with clients

The way I work does change depending on the clients’ needs, I can use elements of CBT or gestalt therapy and my approach is always backed up with honesty. I don’t just expect my clients to trust me, I understand that trust has to be earned and sometimes that takes time, so I don’t just demand information, or feel entitled to pressure people into talking about upsetting experiences just because I am a therapist, that can be both very cruel and counterproductive and, in some cases, abusive.

I take a soft compassionate approach while actively trying to develop their independence by allowing the client as much freedom as they want or need. This is all part of the cognizance therapeutic principal work ethic I adhere to.
This ethic demands that I provide a full free therapy session to both help the client discover if this therapy service and me are right for them, also it gives me time to see if the client is suitable for online therapy, as I have discovered in my eleven years working online, not everyone is.

 The way I work does change depending on the clients’ needs, I can use elements of CBT or gestalt therapy and my approach is always backed up with honesty. I don’t just expect my clients to trust me, I understand that trust has to be earned and sometimes that takes time, so I don’t just demand information, or feel entitled to pressure people into talking about upsetting experiences just because I am a therapist, that can be both very cruel and counterproductive and, in some cases, abusive.

People are not just a collection of symptoms

I understand there is much more to being a therapist than learning and qualifications, unfortunately, you can as a therapist reduce people academically to nothing more than dysfunctional behaviours and symptomatic labels. That is disrespectful to them as people and anyone’s therapeutic process, and I actively try to avoid using technical terms and labels.

Working as a cognizant therapist

Being a cognizant therapist means that one is aware of their own thoughts, feelings, and biases, and how these may impact the therapy process. A cognizant therapist is also mindful of the client’s perspective and is able to understand and validate their experiences.

Being cognizant requires ongoing self-reflection, self-awareness, and a commitment to professional development. A cognizant therapist understands the importance of building trust with their client, and they work to create a safe and supportive environment that is conducive to change and growth.

As a cognizant therapist, one must also be able to recognize and manage their own emotions, and to avoid imposing their own beliefs and values onto the client. They must also be able to recognize and address any power imbalances that may exist in the therapy relationship.

Incorporating cognizance into therapy requires a combination of empathy, active listening, and a non-judgmental approach. A cognizant therapist understands that each client is unique and that their experiences and needs are valid. They work to provide individualized and effective therapy that is tailored to each client’s specific needs and goals.

In short, being a cognizant therapist means being mindful, self-aware, and committed to the client’s well-being, and to creating a safe and supportive environment for change and growth.

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